Archive for June 30, 2011


The .Anything Era

Today’s narrow range of so-called top-level domains (such as .com and .org) are about to be joined by an unlimited range of new ones. These could be used as corporate branding (.coke or .pepsi, for example), to organize multiple sites into categories (think .food, .bank, and anything else). But, while they could open new commercial opportunities and have some security benefits, the domains could also confuse some users, creating new opportunities for fraud artists.

For decades, the Internet has operated with just 21 top-level domains—the most common one being .com (which has about 200 million registered domain names)—plus country names like .jp for Japan and .de for Germany. But last week, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), the nonprofit body that governs the naming system, decided after years of discussion to allow the new custom top-level domains. The organization is about to launch a campaign to raise awareness about their availability, and will accept applications starting January 12, 2012.  

Some companies are already lining up. The camera company Canon, for example, has said it will apply for “.canon” to create one central site, so users wouldn’t need to type “canon.com” in the United States, “canon.de” in Germany, and so on. Some global organizations might want to do the same, for similar reasons. Indeed, ICANN expects most applicants to be corporations. The new top-level domains will work in non-Latin alphabets, too.

However, some observers expect the domains to introduce confusion—and perhaps some new security risks. User confusion already plays a key role in the success of many online scams, such as phishing, in which fraudulent websites that look like bank sites—and that have domain names that seem right—coax people into entering their account numbers. (Similarly, billion-dollar frauds like fake antivirus scams thrive in part on confusion about what a correct virus warning should look like.)

So in theory, scam artists could register something like .savingsbank and confuse people. “You can probably imagine that if someone registers .wellsfargobank and customers erroneously try to go to http://wellsfargobank/; then the end user customer is maybe not going to get the ‛wellsfargobank’ they thought they were asking for,” says Paul Vixie, chairman and chief scientist of Internet Systems Consortium, a nonprofit developer of Internet software and protocols.

There is a limiting factor on such concerns, of course; would-be creators of new top-level domains will have to fork over $185,000 and go through a bureaucratic process to win approval, notes Richard Lamb, who is in charge of domain-name security deployment at ICANN. By contrast, it’s far easier to set up a similar domain name—say, wellsfargobanc.com—to fool people. But the consensus of ICANN’s board is that the overall security risks of the new effort are low. The details of their discussions can be found here.

But Lamb adds that glitches might arise if users try to reach new top-level domains without typing any dots—such as http://canon or similar addresses.

Some operating systems will first look to see if “canon” exists as part of the local domain (for example: canon.technologyreview.com) and then send you there. Similar problems could pertain to e-mail systems. “Fresh from the meeting floor this week, there have been discussions about how the lack of dots in the new top-level domains may get misinterpreted by existing software,” Lamb said.

Courtesy: technologyreview.in

Posted by

Mahesh (MGIT ECE 3rd year)

Watch This Video….

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The pen may have bested the sword long ago, but now it’s challenging wires and soldering irons. University of Illinois engineers have developed a silver-inked rollerball pen capable of writing electrical circuits and interconnects on paper, wood and other surfaces. The pen is writing whole new chapters in low-cost, flexible and disposable electronics. 

Pen-based printing allows one to construct electronic devices ‘on-the-fly,’ ” said Lewis, the director of the Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory at the U. of I. “This is an important step toward enabling desktop manufacturing (or personal fabrication) using very low cost, ubiquitous printing tools.”

While it looks like a typical silver-colored rollerball pen, this pen’s ink is a solution of real silver. After writing, the liquid in the ink dries to leave conductive silver pathways — in essence, paper-mounted wires. The ink maintains its conductivity through multiple bends and folds of the paper, enabling devices with great flexibility and conformability.

Metallic inks have been used in approaches using inkjet printers to fabricate electronic devices, but the pen offers freedom and flexibility to apply ink directly to paper or other rough surfaces instantly, at low cost and without programming.

 

Scientists figured out how to use a rollerball pen to write a circuit directly onto paper.

The pen writes electronic circuits using conductive silver ink. This metallic-based pen could literally change the way flexible electronics are fabricated and possibly bring the cost down.

To demonstrate the versatility of the technique, scientists at the University of Illinois took a Chinese painting called Sae-Han-Do, drew on wiring connecting the LED to a battery and watched it light up.

“The key advantage of the pen is that the costly printers and printheads typically required for inkjet or other printing approaches are replaced with an inexpensive, hand-held writing tool,” said Lewis, who is also affiliated with the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology.

Next, the researchers plan to expand the palette of inks to enable pen-on-paper writing of other electronic and ionically conductive materials.

Courtesy:sciencedaily and from other sources

Posted by

Mahesh (MGIT ECE 3rd year)