Archive for January 3, 2011


BIOMETRICS: GIVING YOU YOUR NEW I.D CARD

Imagine you’re James Bond, and you have to get into a secret laboratory to disarm a deadly biological weapon and save the world. But first, you have to get past the security system. It requires more than just a key or a password — you need to have the villain’s eye, his voice and the shape of his hand to get inside. This technology what villain implemented is nothing but a field in biometrics. You might also encounter this scenario, minus the deadly biological weapon, during an average day on the job.

In this article, you’ll learn about biometric systems that use handwriting, hand geometry, voiceprints, iris structure and vein structure. You’ll also learn why more businesses and governments use the technology and whether Q’s fake contact lenses, recorded voice and silicone hand could really get James Bond into the lab (and let him save the world).

Instead of using something you have (like a key) or something you know (like a password), biometrics uses who you are to identify you. Biometrics can use physical characteristics, like your face, fingerprints, irises or veins, or behavioral characteristics like your voice, handwriting or typing rhythm. Unlike keys and passwords, your personal traits are extremely difficult to lose or forget. They can also be very difficult to copy. For this reason, many people consider them to be safer and more secure than keys or passwords.

IRIS OF OUR EYE ….WHICH IS USED FOR IDENTIFICATION IN BIOMETRICS

Continue reading

Advertisements

MEMRISTORS

A memristor (pronounced /ˈmɛmrɨstər/; a portmanteau of “memory resistor”) is a passive two-terminal circuit element in which the resistance is a function of the history of the current through and voltage across the device. Memristor theory was formulated and named by Leon Chua in a 1971 paper.

On April 30, 2008, a team at HP Labs announced the development of a switching memristor based on a thin film of titanium dioxide. It has a regime of operation with an approximately linear charge-resistance relationship as long as the time-integral of the current stays within certain bounds. These devices are being developed for application in nanoelectronic memories, computer logic, and neuromorphic computer architectures….

Continue reading